When Walking Becomes Total Body Resistance Training

Picture in the public domain.

Picture in the public domain.

Vern and I speed walked and jogged this evening before sunset. At the end of the pavement, where our road becomes gravel, we turned for the mile walk home and within seconds a strong head wind transformed our activity into something more like total body resistance training. The more I stick to my exercise commitment, the more I admire those of you who’ve been doing this for years. This get your body movin’ movin’ movin’ thing is tough. Especially since it’s not in my DNA to enjoy a consistent routine over a length of time.

“…but we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope”–Romans 5:4

Although the apostle Paul was writing about persecution, the Romans 5:4 principle can apply to lots of things, such as working out several days a week, eating healthy, and other mundane or difficult tasks that we faithfully do in order to be well body, soul, and spirit. For me, staying on an exercise routine takes a great deal of perseverance. Sometimes, I’m an unwilling participate who needs encouragement to get moving. For instance, tonight Vern practically dragged me away from my comfortable seat in front of the warm and cozy fire to join him on a walk. Boy! It’s amazing how fast attitudes can change. As soon as we neared the first mile, I was grateful for his cheerful enthusiasm and that he had prodded me to join him. Why did my silent grumbling change to appreciation at the mile marker? Because I had hope of completing the two-mile walk. Perseverance builds character, and character builds hope. In the original language of the Bible, hope is defined as a confident expectation. Hope is a powerful tool to keep you moving forward in your commitment to complete something that’s worthwhile. Including exercise in your week will require some perseverance. You’ll have days when you’d rather sit on the sofa with a good book than get up and follow along with an aerobics instructor for thirty minutes. Or walking for twenty minutes may seem like a real drag when the weather’s not ideal. But have hope, and stick to your commitment. Just as Vern prodded me to join him for a walk, this article is an encouragement from someone who cares about your health. Have hope. Expect good results. And get up and get going. Just like me, you’ll be glad you did. Wishing you wellness in every way, Pamela

Something That’s Been on My Heart

clipart-medical-pulse-512x512-a71aTonight, I won’t be talking about exercise. Don’t worry! I’m not slacking; each time I rise from my chair, for the first ten steps or so I walk as though my legs are strapped to boards. My sore thigh and abdominal muscles testify that I’ve worked them pretty hard.

Neither Vern nor I stretched out enough after Faithful Workout’s killer leg and abdominal routine that we whole-heartedly participated in Saturday evening. And now, we’re paying the price for our oversight and learning a good lesson–after putting them through their paces, muscles need some T.L.C.

There’s something of greater importance on my heart than exercise and nutrition that I want to talk with you about.

Many years ago, I was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, possibly the result of the Epstein Barr virus of which I tested positive.

For five years, my energy level was so low that a simple activity like brushing my teeth drained the little strength that I had. During that season, I visited doctors, a nutritionist, and I spent hundreds of dollars on health products.

Eventually, I found a nutritional supplement that alleviated my suffering. But if I stopped taking it, my energy level did a nosedive into a dark and scary pit.

I wish I could describe the intense joy that I experienced on the day when the Chronic Fatigue suddenly vanished. It was as if someone gave me a second chance at living.

Nutrition, lots of good water, exercise, some sunshine, and rest were beneficial, but these things didn’t cure me.

How did I get well? My miracle came from the Lord as a direct answer to prayer.

If you have chronic poor health and have done all that you can to find a cure, I want you to be encouraged. Miracles happen for other people, and they can happen to you.

Put your trust in the Lord and pray. A person who learns how to pray and to rest in the knowledge that God hears prayer is a person who has learned to be without fear.

Fear, anxiety, and worry–typical conditions of modern society–contribute to disease. At the opposite end of the spectrum is faith. Trusting in God contributes to improved quality of living, and is beneficial for this life and for the one to come (1 Timothy 4:8).

So, as we each pursue better health, let’s remember to keep going after God.

Wishing you all the best,

Pamela

Late Night Stretch

backbend free publicdomainpicturesI’m determined to keep to my commitment of exercising six-days per week. Today has been one of those days when everything runs behind schedule.

The first meeting of the day ran a little later than expected. The next meeting began fifteen-minutes later than it should’ve (due to the other meeting).

Vern and I made chicken-vegetable soup and the soup made dinner an hour later than usual. (Well, the soup’s cook was running a little slow tonight.) Then there was the phone. A family emergency. And now I finally have time to exercise when I should be in bed. Oh yeah, that’s where Vern is. My exercise partner gave up while I was on the phone with his mom. I found him under the covers, lights out.

Just in case you’re following along with us, here’s the link to tonight’s exercise work out, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNtz_wphlgM

I’ve picked a six-minute stretch video with Faithful Workouts for the ideal way to slow down at the end of a busy day. Since I really need to be in bed where my wise husband is soundly sleeping, tonight’s exercise routine will be short and sweet. I’ll make up for it tomorrow.

Happy Stretching,

Pamela