You can Live Fearless…Two Tools that Really Work

You don’t have to live with fear. On this video, Living Fearless, I share two practical tools that really work to free yourself of fear’s subtle and more obvious influences. I’ve put these tools to use and have had such great results that I’m sharing them with whoever is listening…hopefully, that’s you.

I had fun sharing on Facebook’s livestream. I’m still learning to use my equipment, so forgive the 30 second blooper at the beginning. I’ve received good feedback from folks who have put the tips that I share on this video to use.

They had the same good results that I had. The stress or anxiety that they felt went down from something like a 5 to a zero within minutes. These tips that I share really work and that’s why I’m so excited to share this video with you, blooper and all. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Catastrophic Parenting: Daddy Shopping & Auntie Mame’s House

ImagePamela Koefoed’s irresponsible mother Joy Curran had her own ideas about parenting. Children should be allowed to go to bars with their parents, they can be left alone at home for weeks, they should be spoken to as adults, and they should always have good manners.

Joy was a charismatic, free-spirited, single parent whose unconventional parenting created drama and chaos. She pursued two dreams, finding Pamela and Robin a new daddy and having an “Auntie Mame house”—a reference to a 1955 New York Time’s best selling novel about an orphaned boy and his eccentric Aunt Mame and her house of fun.

Later when Joy remarries, someone makes several attempts to destroy the home she and her new husband Max have made for Pamela and Robin, and they flee for their lives. When they divorce, Joy’s escalating drinking and neglect causes Pamela and her sister to depend on each other for emotional support. To survive, the girls are forced to find food and keep to themselves the family secrets.

Pamela tells her story without bitterness and depicts a perspective of her mother as seen through the innocent eyes of childhood. What surprises us all about Pamela and Robin is their spunkiness and resiliency. They draw on the love they have for each other and rise above the flaws in their circumstances to show us all the way to a richer and more meaningful life.

Filled with intrigue and deeply moving, Pamela’s memoir reveals the undying bond that a child has for her mother, the loyalty between sisters, and a love which defies understanding. JoyRide is action packed, rich in detail, and full of hope.

 Readers who enjoyed The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls will love JoyRide: Life, Death and Forgiveness.

I feel I have witnessed the victorious power of love, and the overcoming resilience of the human spirit. This story of triumph over unimaginable difficulty is made all the more poignant by the awareness that it is true.

—Lewis Crownover, musician and founder, Sound of the Harvest

You will not want to put this book down until you have finished it. You will come away with the knowledge that you are never alone no matter how big the trial is that you are going through. An exciting read.

—RitaAnne Poorman, minister and author of Prayers from the Proverbs

 JoyRide, Life, Death and Forgiveness is 317 pages and includes bonus material at the end of the book, an interview with the author and discussion questions. Purchase at www.joyridebook.com

A Shocking Discovery

A Shocking Discovery

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Image courtesy of Sira Anamwong / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

One evening in early summer around dinnertime, I sat on my knees on a dining room chair and played on the kitchen table with my Aunt Cindy’s childhood doll, Baby. A radio beside me was tuned to the news and Mother listened to the weather forecast while stirring a pan of sizzling hamburger and onions seasoned with garlic salt and pepper. The delicious aroma filled the house.

Robin entered the kitchen. “Where’d you get that?” she said, marching over to me.

I danced the doll across the table. “Somewhere.”

She grabbed for it. “You got it from my room. Can I have it?”

I whisked Baby away and clutched her against my chest.

“No, I’m playing with her.”

“But you took her from my room and you’re supposed to ask. Let me have her back,” she said.

Mother came over to the table, the stainless steel spatula glistening with grease in one hand. “Girls, that’s enough of that.” She turned up the radio’s volume. “I’m trying to hear the news.”

The local radio station featured weather forecasts, sports updates, traffic reports, and regional information. Just then, the dramatic voice of a reporter came over the airwaves. “During this evening’s rush hour commute, Keith McKern of Sacramento was involved in a near fatal, head-on, collision.”

The spatula slipped from Mother’s fingers and fell to the floor. She gasped and shuddered. “Oh, no!” The color drained from her face. “Girls, that’s your father!”

We hadn’t seen or heard from him in four years, not since he left when I was a few months old, and Mother had never mentioned his name or her marriage to him. “My father?” I said in shock and confusion. “Who’s my father?”

“Shh! Pam, not now.”

I hadn’t even known that I had a father. “Mommy, who’s my father?”

“I said be quiet.”

The news reporter continued speaking. “He was rushed by ambulance to UC Davis Medical Center and is in critical condition.”

From JoyRide: Life, Death and Forgiveness pages 28-29

To learn more about JoyRide, visit http://www.joyridebook.com where you will find excerpts and my interview on Focus Today. 

Thank you for taking the time to read this excerpt and to visit my blog.

Copyright © 2013 by Pamela Koefoed. All rights reserved.

A Writer’s Life

My publicist, Mr. NewImageman, is getting things in order for a radio tour to introduce my memoir, JoyRide: Life, Death and Forgiveness to America–wow. I’m feeling a little mixed about it. I’m excited, but I’m also apprehensive. I suppose these kinds of feelings are normal.

Looking forward to blogging my experiences from this new leg of the journey.

On Focus Today, I speak about my harrowing childhood.

My story has always been mine, so it astonishes me when those who hear me tell it have an over-the-top shocked, amazed, or dumb-founded reaction. It’s typical for people to stare with tear filled eyes and ask, “Are you real?” Followed by, “How come you’re doing so well?”

This video is from Focus Today with Perry Atkinson, Dove T.V. Watch for his reaction to what he hears. It’s priceless.

I Panhandled in Sacramento

ImageMy stomach ached with hunger. Mother left my eleven-year-old sister Robin and me home alone for several days without food. The cupboards were bare. The refrigerator had a half empty jug of Gallo and some dried out celery in a produce drawer but that was all.

Panhandling wasn’t something I ever imagined for myself. I was nine-years-old, almost fearless, and absolutely lacking in begging skills. I stationed myself outside the neighborhood grocery store, and waited beside the automatic doors. How do I do this? I guess I just stand here until someone nice sees me and gives me food.

Five minutes later, a woman exited with her shopping cart of groceries. She’s rich, I thought as I ogled her cart filled with brown paper bags containing a carton of eggs, milk, bananas, oranges, steak, and French bread. All that good looking stuff made my mouth water and my stomach grumble. Meekly, I held out one grubby hand. She stopped for a minute and met my hungry gaze. Then she surprised me. Reaching into her purse, she pulled out a dollar and gave it to me before hurrying away.

“Geez, thank you,” I called after her.

When I returned home, I smiled smugly at Robin. “Guess what?” I asked in a low voice.

“How would I know?” she said. “Tell me.”

“No. You have to guess,” I said.

“You found something.”

“Nope. Guess again.”

“The ice cream man gave you a fudge sickle.”

“No. That was last week.” I looked over my shoulder as if someone were in the room with us. “I had a candy bar,” I whispered. “And guess how I got it?”

Robin’s eyes grew large with curiosity. “I don’t know, how?” The tone of her voice rose. “What did you do?”

“I stood outside the store and a lady came over to me and I asked her in a super sad voice, ‘Do you have a dollar for a poor child?’”

Robin’s face dropped. “Pam!” She gasped. “You didn’t!”

“What’s wrong with that?”

“What’s wrong? You shouldn’t ask people for money. That’s what hobos and street people do.”

I smiled at her shocked expression. “Just kidding!” I giggled. “Would I do something like that?”

“Yeah, you would.”

“Really, I didn’t have to say a word. I just held out my hand, and she gave me a dollar.”

“Pam, don’t do that ever again.”

* * * *

Pamela’s latest book, JoyRide, Life, Death and Forgiveness, a Memoir is available by credit card or Paypal at http://www.joyridebook.com and through Amazon.